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Maryland Geographers: Emily Day

Date Posted: 8/18/16

Meet Emily Day, current Permit Technician II (comparable to an “Engineering Technician”) at DC Water (District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority). Her job comes with many different responsibilities, including managing GIS data, reviewing construction plans, running quality assurance, in addition to overseeing a number of side projects. Essentially, Emily is the go-to person in the office when new projects need to be reviewed.

 

Emily graduated with a degree in Geography from Towson University in 2014. She explains that her geography education has not only developed her GIS and problem solving skills, but continues to serve as a foundation for the ways in which she observes the changing environment around her. While at the office, she collaborates with engineers on their quantitative research to help resolve issues. Outside of the office, she sees firsthand the positive and negative aspects of DC’s rapidly changing metropolitan area.

 

As a GIS user working in local government, Emily recently attended the Esri User Conference in San Diego. While there, she attended a number of presentations and young professional sessions that helped refine her GIS and office skills. There were presentations from local governments and utility companies that Emily made a special effort in attending. She recalls one presentation in particular where citizens in the city of Los Angeles can quickly access and contribute data, producing an up-to-date and accurate database.

 

With her academic and professional background in geography, Emily has learned the importance of geographic education. She emphasizes this need for universal geographic literacy so that people can solve major issues in order to avoid coping with their environmentally and politically catastrophic effects. Though she claims she could write a book of all the reasons why geography education is important, she sums it up nicely in one sentence: “It is extremely important for us to understand the world that we live in, the planet that we live on, and the people that we live with.”

 

Read the full interview here.

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